[Previous][Next]


Although ancient Beirut was a small city, its strong fortification system speaks in favor of an important city, certainly in the Bronze Age and probably in the Iron Age as well. It seems rather unlikely that all these defensive walls discovered represent stretches of chronologically successive circuits. At any one time some elements must have coexisted to give a multiple trace defensive system. This hypothesis could be elucidated once the site excavation is completed.

  • The Phoenician city of Beirut is now a confirmed reality. The question of why it was not included among the list of other Phoenician cities, is yet to be answered. It could have been controlled by a major neighboring city-state kingdom i.e. Byblos or Sidon.
  • The recent discoveries of the ancient tell shed much light on the relations between Beirut and the western Mediterranean: Cyprus and the Aegean Coast.
  • With the results of our excavations, the ancient tell of Beirut presents a continuous occupation from the 3rd millennium B.C. to the present time. (The results of the later classical-Byzantine-Medieval- Ottoman periods will be presented in future preliminary reports).
Because of these major results, the contribution of the tell excavation is probably the most important in the urban archaeological project of Beirut. For this reason, the decision to preserve the ancient tell was made official on October 12, 1996 by H. E. Mr. Michel Eddé, former Minister of Culture and Higher Education.

   

[Previous][Next]


Created by the Digital Documentation Center at AUB in collaboration with Al Mashriq of Høgskolen i Østfold, Norway.

9907 MH - Email: badre@aub.edu.lb